WordVision: A Writer’s Wet Dream

Friday, 16 January 2009

If there are any word nerds and writing weirdos out there like me, the new WordVision tool will absolutely blow you away. This copywriting and SEO toolset does a ton of cool stuff with keywords, too much to even go into here, so I’m going to focus just on what it can do for you from a writer’s perspective. That’s where I’ve been focusing my play time with my free trial, and, let’s face it, that algorithm stuff that explains how it works kind of goes over my head. I just know it’s the coolest writer’s tool I’ve seen since spellcheck.

Boost rankings and get your point across faster with keyword and copywriting tools to improve SEO content

WordVision is a subscription service, powered by ideaLaunch, that allows writers and SEO managers to optimize content better, faster and wider using an in-depth toolset they’ve created. According to the WordVision website, it will “find the hot topics and keyword phrases and track the impact of content assets you publish [using] algorithmic data-crunching.” What all this amounts to is a robust set of tools that help you improve your content to rank higher and for more terms organically; bid smarter for PPC and pay less by having higher quality content; track your performance and scope out what your competitors are doing.

WordVision appeals to all types and levels of SEOs by including Writer Tools, SEO Manager Tools and Reporting Features. Naturally, all of this hinges on having good, targeted keywords to work from, and, surprise, surprise, WordVisison has Keyword Setup tools as well! Of course, being a copywriter myself, I’m saving my gushing over the Writer Tools for last, but here’s a brief overview of the other features as well:

Keyword Tools

Start by adding keywords off the top of your head, or by copy and pasting from an existing list. Weight keywords at this initial stage, or go back and rank them by importance once you have finished adding all keywords. You can also add competitors to keep an eye on what they’re doing, tag keywords to keep yourself organized and input sample content for keyword recommendations.

SEO Manager Tools

Once your keywords are all loaded in, either by hand or with some help from the WordVision tools, you can view the entire list of keywords, including your position in Google, PPC price, search volume, keyword weight and tag(s). The layout is super simple and easy to read, so you can tell “at a glance” where you stand. There’s also a list of Weighted Keywords that shows how your more important search terms are performing, and a Tagged Keywords section to keep tabs on your “low hanging fruit.”

Writing Tools

WordVision, how do I love thee? Let me count the ways. The Writing Tools showed me how well a specific page was optimized, but from that I was able to assess what level my SEO copywriting skills were on in general as well. Likewise, it provided suggestions for the actual page I had in the system, but I was able to infer what improvements I could be making to my writing overall.

Writing Wow #1: Keyword Cloud

>Simply type in a keyword that represents the theme of a page (I was using my new site and looking for lip gloss keyword variations) and poof! Like magic, a giant keyword cloud pops up with a suggestion of all the related words and phrases you might want to use throughout the page as well.

Writing Wow #2: Score Content

My jaw literally dropped when I saw this. I’m sure there are other programs that do similar things, but this is the first I’ve really used and by far the simplest and cleanest I’ve seen. Copy the text of a blog post, page or article and paste it into the content scorer. You’ll be rewarded with a score from 1-100 based on the keyword list you input earlier, as well as ideas for Title and Keyword tags and possible additional keywords.

As far as I can tell the Score Content feature judges your optimization level solely on content optimization, as the name implies; this means it does not take into account factors like H tags, page name, image optimization or inbound links. So, if you’re doing a thorough job of on-page optimization beyond good, optimized copy, it’s safe to say your actual score would be a little bit higher. But this gives you a solid idea of where your raw content stands, and how you can improve.

The only thing I was left wondering was what the “average” score was for content run through this system, or for a standard page on the internet. I’d also like to know what a “good” score is; obviously you’d like to get 100, but is that possible without being spammy?

Or is this like Advanced Chemistry, and a 60 is the highest anyone gets, so you’re doing well with a 45? These might be features available in the paid version or in the works for future updates. I’ll keep you posted. Or, sign up for a free trial of WordVision and try it for yourself.

1 Comment

  • Awesome blog post! Thanks for breaking it down. You’ve got me all excited about it, too!

    Comment by Lollie Shopping — January 16, 2009 @ 1:15 pm

Leave a comment

RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI